The Netherlands drops among most competitive economies

wefThe World Economic Forum (WEF) has published its 2013 ranking of countries on the basis of their innovativeness and competitiveness.

The Netherlands had slipped three places, going down to an 8th place.

Top institute INSCOPE: Research for Innovation, under the direction of Henk Volberda, Professor of Strategic Management & Business Policy at Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM) is partner institute of the WEF and has collected the data for the Netherlands.

The full report (in Dutch) can be found here.

These are the ranking’s most important findings:

  • The Dutch government’s policy is not working. The Netherlands has dropped out the top five of the world’s most competitive economies.

Over the past year, Dutch competitiveness has declined considerably. The budget deficit, the badly functioning financial markets and increasing anxiety over the stability of Dutch banks are affecting the Dutch economy. On top of that come an ineffective labour market and delays in making investments in innovation. The upshot is that the Netherlands has lost ground and tumbles out of the top five to an 8th place.

  • Lagging investments in innovation exact a toll on the Dutch economy.

The Netherlands has been unable to retain its top-five position – because of decreasing corporate investment in R&D, the dire need for technicians and engineers, poor cooperation between companies and universities, as well as the lack of governmental direction and coordination. The government policy of focussing on pivotal economic sectors is moving forward too slowly and is resulting in an innovation policy with few tangible results.

  • Switzerland, Singapore and Finland have managed to stay ahead of the pack by continuing to invest in innovation and education. German innovation policy is yielding results, too.

Germany has now joined the top-ranked countries, reaching 4th place. It has done so by making substantial investments in R&D, new technologies, plus excellent training and education for new technicians and engineers. After years of falling behind, the United States have once again grabbed the No. 5 position, owing to growing confidence in its public institutions, a flexible labour market, as well as investments in R&D and elite-level education.

  • Southern European economies show a mixed picture, although the EU’s monetary policies seems to bearing fruit.

Southern European economies such as France (23), Italy (47) and Portugal (51) are trailing further behind in the global competitiveness index. However, Spain (35) and Greece (91) are showing small improvements, apparently due to the EU’s policy.

  • Growth spurt of BRIC countries is over.

Of the five BRIC countries, only Russia has climbed the ranking, while Brazil has slipped eight places. China is still the best-performing BRIC country (29), followed by South Africa (53), Brazil (56), India (60) and Russia (64).

Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM) is ranked amongst Europe’s top 10 businessschools for education and amongst the top three for research. RSM provides ground-breaking research and education furthering excellence in all aspects of management and is based in the international port city of Rotterdam – a vital nexus of business, logistics and trade. RSM’s primary focus is on developing business leaders with international careers who carry their innovative mindset into a sustainable future thanks to a first-class range of bachelor, master, MBA, PhD and executive programmes. RSM also has offices in the Amsterdam Zuidas business district and in Taipei, Taiwan. www.rsm.nl

These are the ranking’s most important findings:

  • The Dutch government’s policy is not working. The Netherlands has dropped out the top five of the world’s most competitive economies.

Over the past year, Dutch competitiveness has declined considerably. The budget deficit, the badly functioning financial markets and increasing anxiety over the stability of Dutch banks are affecting the Dutch economy. On top of that come an ineffective labour market and delays in making investments in innovation. The upshot is that the Netherlands has lost ground and tumbles out of the top five to an 8th place.

  • Lagging investments in innovation exact a toll on the Dutch economy.

Henk VolberdaThe Netherlands has been unable to retain its top-five position – because of decreasing corporate investment in R&D, the dire need for technicians and engineers, poor cooperation between companies and universities, as well as the lack of governmental direction and coordination. The government policy of focussing on pivotal economic sectors is moving forward too slowly and is resulting in an innovation policy with few tangible results.

  • Switzerland, Singapore and Finland have managed to stay ahead of the pack by continuing to invest in innovation and education. German innovation policy is yielding results, too.

Germany has now joined the top-ranked countries, reaching 4th place. It has done so by making substantial investments in R&D, new technologies, plus excellent training and education for new technicians and engineers. After years of falling behind, the United States have once again grabbed the No. 5 position, owing to growing confidence in its public institutions, a flexible labour market, as well as investments in R&D and elite-level education.

  • Southern European economies show a mixed picture, although the EU’s monetary policies seems to bearing fruit.

Southern European economies such as France (23), Italy (47) and Portugal (51) are trailing further behind in the global competitiveness index. However, Spain (35) and Greece (91) are showing small improvements, apparently due to the EU’s policy.

  • Growth spurt of BRIC countries is over.

Of the five BRIC countries, only Russia has climbed the ranking, while Brazil has slipped eight places. China is still the best-performing BRIC country (29), followed by South Africa (53), Brazil (56), India (60) and Russia (64).

Top institute INSCOPE: Research for Innovation, under the direction of Henk Volberda, Professor of Strategic Management & Business Policy at Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM) is partner institute of the WEF and has collected the data for the Netherlands. The full report (in Dutch) can be found here.

– See more at: http://www.rsm.nl/about-rsm/news/detail/3012-the-netherlands-drops-out-of-the-top-five-of-most-competitive-economies-worldwide/#sthash.lSvpo9Af.dpuf

he World Economic Forum (WEF) has published its 2013 ranking of countries on the basis of their innovativeness and competitiveness. The Netherlands had slipped three places, going down to an 8th place.

These are the ranking’s most important findings:

  • The Dutch government’s policy is not working. The Netherlands has dropped out the top five of the world’s most competitive economies.

Over the past year, Dutch competitiveness has declined considerably. The budget deficit, the badly functioning financial markets and increasing anxiety over the stability of Dutch banks are affecting the Dutch economy. On top of that come an ineffective labour market and delays in making investments in innovation. The upshot is that the Netherlands has lost ground and tumbles out of the top five to an 8th place.

  • Lagging investments in innovation exact a toll on the Dutch economy.

Henk VolberdaThe Netherlands has been unable to retain its top-five position – because of decreasing corporate investment in R&D, the dire need for technicians and engineers, poor cooperation between companies and universities, as well as the lack of governmental direction and coordination. The government policy of focussing on pivotal economic sectors is moving forward too slowly and is resulting in an innovation policy with few tangible results.

  • Switzerland, Singapore and Finland have managed to stay ahead of the pack by continuing to invest in innovation and education. German innovation policy is yielding results, too.

Germany has now joined the top-ranked countries, reaching 4th place. It has done so by making substantial investments in R&D, new technologies, plus excellent training and education for new technicians and engineers. After years of falling behind, the United States have once again grabbed the No. 5 position, owing to growing confidence in its public institutions, a flexible labour market, as well as investments in R&D and elite-level education.

  • Southern European economies show a mixed picture, although the EU’s monetary policies seems to bearing fruit.

Southern European economies such as France (23), Italy (47) and Portugal (51) are trailing further behind in the global competitiveness index. However, Spain (35) and Greece (91) are showing small improvements, apparently due to the EU’s policy.

  • Growth spurt of BRIC countries is over.

Of the five BRIC countries, only Russia has climbed the ranking, while Brazil has slipped eight places. China is still the best-performing BRIC country (29), followed by South Africa (53), Brazil (56), India (60) and Russia (64).

Top institute INSCOPE: Research for Innovation, under the direction of Henk Volberda, Professor of Strategic Management & Business Policy at Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM) is partner institute of the WEF and has collected the data for the Netherlands. The full report (in Dutch) can be found here.

– See more at: http://www.rsm.nl/about-rsm/news/detail/3012-the-netherlands-drops-out-of-the-top-five-of-most-competitive-economies-worldwide/#sthash.lSvpo9Af.dpuf

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